On the Profound Significance of Tsfat to Our Generation

On December 10, 2005, during Chanukah, hundreds of people gathered in lower Manhattan at the Museum of Jewish Heritage—A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. A dinner was held honoring the Holy City of Tsfat. The themes of the evening were renewal in a post-Holocaust era, the magic of Tsfat and Rebbe Nachman of Breslev. Rav Moshe Weinberger of Congregation Aish Kodesh in Woodmere, New York, addressed an extraordinarily diverse crowd on the profound significance of Tsfat to our generation.

It is hard for me to describe the feelings and emotions of this evening. I am thinking back ten years ago to the first gathering [for Tsfat] that we had in Brooklyn, held in a room filled with approximately the same number of people, different groups, different types, but all chassidim. Tonight, I can’t help but think and wonder about the great strength of both Rebbe Nachman, may his merit protect us, and the Holy City of Tsfat, and how they have somehow miraculously drawn Jews of such diverse backgrounds together to this place.

Rebbe Nachman once said that in the world, stories are told to put children to sleep, but [Breslever chassidim] tell stories to keep children awake. In the introduction to Likutey Moharan, Rebbe Nachman speaks about the great Tanna, Rebbe Shimon bar Yochai. He quotes the verse in Aramaic from the book of Daniel, Ir V’kadish Min Shemaya Nachit [1]….[an angel, a holy one, descended from heaven] which literally means “the one who is awake and was sent into this world from heaven.” I believe the connection between the magical city of Tsfat and Rebbe Nachman has created an awakening in our generation. What brings us all here from different places is the miracle of Rebbe Nachman’s message.

I understand that there are guests of honor and many of you have come to honor them, but I don’t believe for a moment that is why we are here. We are here because Rebbe Nachman is pulling upon the chord strings of our hearts to come. We are all here to give honor to that tzaddik whom G-d Himself sent here into the world when it was falling asleep. He sent him into the world to wake us up.

I want to share with you something very remarkable. Rebbe Nachman describes a mysterious field where wondrous trees and plants grow.[2] It is also where holy souls, neshamos, develop. And yet, he writes, “There are many many naked souls who are bare and wandering, unable to make their way into the field. They are waiting and longing for someone to come along and repair their souls, so they can return to their place.” Who is the person who has the power to do this? Rebbe Nachman explains in this lesson that there is a “master of the field”. This master of the field has wondrous eyes and when the eyes of the master of the field are illuminated, he is able to see great visions beyond the gates of that mysterious field, to those souls wandering and waiting for a tikkun, waiting for someone to bring them back. Rebbe Nachman says there are two types of fields in the world. There is the field of visionaries and the field of weepers; a field where people are crying and weeping, and the field of the tzaddik—the master of the field.

The city of Tsfat is the field of visionaries for our generation. It is the field of dreams, the field of vision, the field where Jews look beyond the confines of the four cubits of their little lives and dream of something greater and bigger. It is to that field, that the master of the field, the tzaddik, has mysteriously taken us. He draws us to that place.

That is why we are here. Some of you are wondering, “What am I doing here listening to some guy with a fur hat screaming at me? What’s going on? I was friends with this guy and he asked me to come to this dinner honoring Tsfat. Tsfat is a nice place, it seems like a charming little city, but I didn’t know that there was anything so miraculous or great happening there…”

The truth is, our generation is filled with tears. We are naked souls trying to get back into that authentic world of Rebbe Nachman. So why is it, that ten years ago, I addressed a chassidic gathering, but now we are sitting here in Manhattan and it is not a chassidic gathering? It is a gathering of all different types of friends from different backgrounds. You know why? It is because we are approaching Chanukah and Chanukah is the celebration of that one jar of undefiled pure oil. Everybody in the world is looking for something authentic. We’re sick of cynicism, we’re sick of sarcasm. We’re sick of hypocrisy and phoniness. Everyone is looking for that pure jar of oil, unaffected by the outside world. Therefore, the city of Tsfat, the field of the visionaries, as well as the visionary of all visionaries, Rebbe Nachman, calls to each one of us who haven’t forgotten the authentic drop of oil that enlivens each and every one of our souls and calls us to come back to HaShem, to return to the Master of all, the Master of the world, Hashem Himself.

I want to conclude with a little story. There was a great rebbe, Reb Yaakov from Isbitz. He was known as the “Beis Yaakov.”[3] This rebbe, the Beis Yaakov, was a huge scholar who for over twenty years, gave a very deep lesson in the gemara. He gave the lesson every single night from midnight until 4:00 in the morning for over two decades. Someone who described what it was like said it was unforgettable. “It was the deepest lesson and I was one of the few people privileged to attend. I don’t remember all of the lessons, but I’ll tell you one thing I remember. Exactly at midnight, the rebbe would walk in. On one side of the rebbe, there was a person holding the gemara, and on the other side, there was another person holding a candle. When the lesson was over, he gave a kiss to the gemara. It is that kiss I remember. It is the kiss that keeps me alive and pushes me on despite all my difficulties to be a Jew.”

Rebbe Nachman gave a kiss to our people. Those who haven’t learned, those who haven’t heard—learn, listen, and hear. You will then understand that the second you walk into Tsfat, you’ll feel the embrace of his love, you’ll feel the kiss the Beis Yaakov gave to the Gemara that can’t be described in words, because it is beyond words.

The soul of a Jew is filled with a yearning for G-d. That’s why we’re here. We yearn for G-d. We yearn for His people, we yearn for His holy city of Tsfat and we yearn to connect once again to that pure undefiled jar of oil inside each and every one of us. May HaShem bless the Jewish people. May we all merit not just to talk about Tsfat and see films of Tsfat, but to go together with all of our dear friends and chaverim to reclaim the land and bring our people back to the Holy City of Tsfat and Jerusalem, to the complete redemption and the beis hamikdash, speedily in our days, Amen. ♦


1. The first letters of these words spell “Shimon” alluding to Rebbe Shimon bar Yochai, with whom Rebbe Nachman shares a profound soul connection.

2. Likutey Moharan 65

3. From the book he authored, called “Beis Yaakov.”

In a tradition handed down from the students of the Arizal, when the first Jewish Temple was destroyed, the Shechina retreated slowly in stages until She came to rest in the Holy City of Tsfat. And there She remains until the final redemption. Rebbe Nachman of Breslev tells a story about a lost princess on a Golden Mountain. According to R’ Gedaliah Aharon Kenig, the Golden Mountain is Tsfat.

The unique role Tsfat plays in the redemption of the world is explained in this kabbalistic teaching from the Arizal.

כי בחר ה׳ בציון, אוה למושב לו

(תהילים קלב׳ י״ג)

“For God has chosen Zion. He has desired it for His habitation.”

(Psalms 132:13)

According to the Arizal, the rearranged letters of the Hebrew word אוה (desired) in atbash* spell  צפת “Tsfat.” The letters of the Hebrew word בחר‭‬(chosen) can be rearranged to spell חרב‭ ‬(destroyed). Tsfat will be His habitation, i.e., after the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem the Shechina receded to Tsfat, and will remain there until the coming of the Messiah. It is further written in the Zohar that the Messiah will be revealed first in the Galilee. According to the commentator Meam Loez, this refers to the city of Tsfat, clearly indicating the tremendous importance and holiness of the Galilee and its centrality for Jews and all mankind. ♦


*A type of gematria where the order of the Hebrew alphabet is reversed, i.e., the first letter (aleph) is substituted for the last letter (tav); beit becomes shin, etc.

At the end of exile, close to the time of our redemption, Israel’s troubles will greatly strengthen and intensify. Because of the tremendous travail that will surround them from every side, they will say, “Let the mountains and hills fall on us to hide us.” Their straits will become so dire that fathers will abandon their sons. Anyone who survives this period will be considered a triumphant warrior.

This will all come about since the Shechina will judge her house, Israel, and their adherence to sexual morality, in order to purify them for the Final Redemption and the good promised by the prophets. This good is utterly incomprehensible to the human intellect. The miracles and wonders of the redemption from Egypt will not be remembered in comparison to the final redemption. As it is written, “The days are coming,” says the L-rd, “when it will no longer be said, ‘As the L-rd lives, who brought the children of Israel up out of Egypt,’ but instead it will be said, ‘As the L-rd lives, who brought the Israelites up out of the land of the north and out of all the countries where He had banished them.’ For I will restore them to the land I gave to their ancestors.” (Jer. 16:14-15).

At the time of the Final Redemption the miracles and revelation of the Shechina to Israel will be wondrous. All who are worthy will exclaim, “Here is HaShem; we hoped for Him!” (Isa. 25:9). They will literally point their finger at the revelation of the Shechina. Who will actually merit this?!

Therefore, during this same time, troubles will increase to refine Israel according to strict judgment. Every single person will regret according to their debt, and anyone who stiffens their neck and refuses to return will be lost. Whoever will return in teshuva, and welcomes and accepts the difficulties gladly, will be purified and made worthy.

The entire matter rests on the fact that the time will have arrived for the klipot (“husks,” forces of evil) to be nullified in the world. However, as long as their wickedness clings to Israel, how is it possible to nullify these “external forces”? The L-rd is the Master of Judgment, meting out a righteous and faithful justice, with no perversion. Therefore, Israel will undergo repeated purging and refining until they are clean and pure as refined silver. This divine process will be administered with strict judgment, since the klipa will demand any portion owed to it.

In these final days, nations will fight each other, each one’s sword against its neighbor, and Israel will be caught in between, with tremendous suffering. Each nation will desire to plunder this “sheep” and consume her flesh. However, the Holy One will take compassion on His people in the merit of the three holy forefathers [Avraham, Yitzchak, and Yaakov], and their suffering will refine and whiten them. During this time of judgment, the Holy One will overthrow the seed of Amalek, cut it off from the world, and ‘erase him from under the heavens.’ ♦


Translated and adapted from Elima Rabbati by the RaMaK, Rabbi Moshe Cordovero (1522-1570), one of the greatest kabbalists prior to the arrival of the holy Arizal in Tsfat. In this profound mystical work, the RaMaK mentions the need to accept difficulties in life with love, particularly during the generations close to the coming of Mashiach.

BIRTH AND DEATH, one day flows into the next. Souls are brought into the world while others depart. The generation of the Arizal was no different in this regard. Yet, every few centuries or so, heaven sends down a great soul for the betterment and tikkun of the creation—a caliber of tzaddik who holds the root of all other souls. This was the characteristic that distinguished the soul of Moses, and is the power held by any tzaddik on this same redemptive level. Human beings they are, not gods. But each is endowed with the same noble mission: to bring more goodness and healing into a world begging for ultimate repair.

THE ARIZAL WAS A TZADDIK ON THIS LEVEL. He came quietly into the world and departed a short 38 years later, leaving his mark to forever change the world. His parents lived in Jerusalem. His father Shlomo, was a wholehearted, simple, and upright individual who feared heaven and avoided evil. One day, while alone in the synagogue praying and pleading to HaShem, Elijah the prophet appeared to him and said, “I was sent from heaven to inform you that your wife will conceive and bear a son, and you should call him ‘Yitzchak’. He will save the souls of Israel from the hand of the klipot and repair souls reincarnated many times while waiting for their tikkun. Through him, knowledge of the kabbalah will be revealed; he’ll know every wisdom in the world, and his name will be famous far and wide.” Before Elijah disappeared, he cautioned, “Just be careful to wait for me to appear again on the eighth day before you circumcise him, since I will be the sandek.”

Shlomo wondered greatly about the vision and remained the rest of the day in the synagogue crying and praying to HaShem, “Please G-d, fulfill the words of Elijah. No misdeeds of mine should prevent this, since I am small and without merit. Do this for Your sake, not mine.”

He returned home that evening without revealing his secret. It thus happened and his wife conceived. Every day the pregnancy progressed, he would cry from joy. His wife carried to term and bore a son who filled their house with light. On the eighth day, as the community came together for the circumcision, Shlomo searched the crowd to no avail for the prophet Elijah. He began to suffer greatly while the guests began to pressure him to begin the circumcision without delay. He put them off, claiming that all of his relatives had not yet arrived. The situation continued for about a half an hour, as he anguished in his heart, until he let out a bitter cry, thinking to himself, “If the prophet Elijah has not come, it means that this is not the child he spoke about. Obviously my transgressions have prevented this good from happening.” In the midst of his weeping, Elijah appeared and called to him saying, “Don’t weep, I only tarried in order to test you as to whether or not you would honor my word.” He then joyfully sat on the sandek’s chair as the infant was placed on his knees to begin the circumcision. No one but the infant’s father, Shlomo, was aware of what had transpired. The child was then circumcised and given the name Yitzchak. He was returned to his mother and before they arrived back home, the circumcision had healed completely, much to their amazement.

After the child grew and was weaned, he went off to school where he stood apart from the other children in his level of learning. By the age of eight, like a seasoned scholar, he was a wellspring of halacha, and no one matched his sharpness. During this time, his father Shlomo passed away and his mother told him, “My son, I am now a widow with no ability to buy the books you need. So you must go down to Egypt to live with your uncle. You will be able to progress there since he is very wealthy and you won’t lack a thing. The boy said, “I am ready to do whatever you ask of me.” He then traveled to Egypt to live with his uncle, who received him with great honor and as his own son. In time, the boy’s extraordinary brilliance in learning and wisdom gained the attention of the famous sage, R’ Betzalel Ashkenazi, who contacted his uncle requesting that the boy become his student. Yitzchak studied with R’ Ashkenazi until he was fifteen years old, at which point his wisdom had already begun to impact on all the older and more established scholars in Egypt. Yitzchak soon married and continued to progress step by step in the service of G-d, attaining spectacular heights.

This was all preparation for his brief stay in Tsfat, where he and his followers concretized the highest spiritual levels into daily life, preparing a heavenly template to be accessed in the future by anyone willing to make the effort. ♦


Based on Shivchei HaAri (“Praises of the Arizal”), Chapter 1.

TSFAT, SPLENDOROUS CITY OF PASSIONATE YEARNING. A mere two obscure references to her exist in early Talmudic writings. Cryptic and hidden, she has nonetheless attracted those destined to plumb and reveal the mysteries of Torah for the world. Rarely called by name, she exerts her influence quietly on those who understand her preciousness, as she gently prods them higher against the worldly current. So why call attention to her now? Because she is calling out, “Awaken from your slumber! Have you forgotten? A beautiful and magnificent inheritance awaits you! But you must first believe, then search with a pure and hopeful heart.” Exuding an unexpected and faint familiarity, her cobblestone alleyways are conducive to enlightenment—yet it must be stubbornly sought out. She beckons you ever higher—to utilize atrophied spiritual muscles to actualize the pregnant potential of the sacred. Sitting beneath the heavenly throne, source of all souls, her fullest expression will remain untapped until she is reunited with Am Yisrael. A realized deed forms an imprint not only here, but forges a template on high. It generates a force field not only of tendency and potential, but a promise of realization as well. The brief tenure of the Arizal in the holy city of Tsfat fused heaven and earth as deed actualized vision—possibility conquered reality. So fruitful was this time that we are destined to attain these spiritual levels and soar beyond. The key to redemption is to believe not only in its possibility, but prepare ourselves to go beyond our highest aspirations. Since after all, the final redemption is a gift of unconditional love. ♦